How to stay connected for better health

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Connection and bonding are important requirements for humans to feel good and boost well-being. If you are well connected to your loved ones and family you can better communicate which is key to a healthy relationship. A good relationship is a foundation for a good life which we all cherish. So staying connected personally in this hyperconnected world where you know what other is doing but do not know really what they feel is important.

How to stay connected
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Make sure everyone you’re close to has your contact info.

  • Create an address book that lists everyone you’re close to, including family, friends, and work colleagues. I also include former colleagues and mentors I’ve stayed in touch with over the years. If you keep all of your contacts logged in one place, it’s easier to make sure you have the most up-to-date information for each person.
  • Share your contact information with the people who matter to you so they can keep in touch with you as well. It might feel awkward at first, but if anyone asks why you’re sharing your info or wants details about what kinds of things you’re up to these days. Just be honest: “I’m trying to be more intentional about staying connected.” That’s a totally reasonable thing to say!

We live such busy lives that it’s easy for someone important (or just someone we like talking with) to slip through the cracks. By sharing contact info and keeping my address book updated regularly, I’ve felt more confident that the people I love are never too far away. Even when they’re over a thousand miles away from me!

Don’t be afraid to reach out first.

Don’t be afraid, then, to reach out first. People love to feel like they matter and that you care, so asking someone how they’re doing or if they’re free to get together can make all the difference.

Remember that real friends aren’t just text messages or Facebook acquaintances; they’re actual human beings who appreciate a good FaceTime session or Friday night dinner date.

So go ahead!

Don’t be shy! Reach out and touch base with your loved ones—they’ll thank you for it.

Send an email, text, or letter just to check-in.

  • Send an email, text, or letter just to check-in.
  • Try to reach out at least once a month or so.
  • This is the easiest way to maintain a connection with someone. You can say something like, “Hey! Just wanted to see how you’re doing. I’ve been busy with work and just thought about you, so I wanted to reach out.”
  • While it’s important that you don’t wait too long between messages, this method works best when you make it a habit of reaching out regularly.

Another option is saying something like, “I want to reach out but don’t know what to say.

Do you have any suggestions on what might be a good topic?”

This gives your friend the opportunity to steer the conversation in a direction they find comfortable while also showing them that you are making an effort.

Ask what it would mean to that person to stay close.

  • You should ask what it would mean to that person to stay close.
  • Then, you should ask whether they want to stay in touch and how often they would like to stay in touch.
  • Finally, you should ask how they would like to keep in touch.

Remember the little things about them.

  • Make it a priority to remember the little things about them, like their favorite color, what type of food they like, how they take their coffee, that show they loved in elementary school and always quote from.
  • Take notes if you need to! If you can’t think of something at the moment, just ask them about it later when you’re thinking about it more.

Make time for them when you can.

Being able to spend time together with your friends and family is important. But being flexible about how you do that, and making sure you connect when you can, is even more important.

If you’re worried about the lack of face-to-face interaction, think about other ways that you can get the same benefits of spending time together (like video chatting, instant messaging, or phone calls), then make an effort to fit these into your busy schedule. Set aside some time to catch up—then keep your commitment. If this means saying “no” to something else on your agenda, so be it! You value this relationship; make it happen!

Help find solutions that work for both of you: ask what works best for them and follow through by making the effort to stay connected.

Plan ahead for a date or lunch.

Once a month, plan ahead for a date or lunch. Don’t wait until you’ve lost touch and need to rekindle the relationship to see one another again!

If you’re trying to figure out how much time has passed since you last talked, take it as a good sign that there’s no need to ruminate over that question—just pick up where you left off.

If they can’t see you, ask how they’d like to stay in touch. Some people prefer phone calls or texts, others letters or email exchanges or Skype sessions, etc. If a date is not possible right now due to their schedule, write down a date on your calendar and put out some possible times so they know they are a priority for you too. You can even keep these dates in ink on the same day every month if that’s what works.

  • Just don’t leave it open-ended!
  • Don’t just assume that you know what they need.
  • Try not to focus on what you want from the relationship and instead focus on what they want or need.
  • If they can’t see you, ask how they’d like to stay in touch.

Some people prefer phone calls or texts, others letters or email exchanges or Skype sessions, etc. If a date is not possible right now due to their schedule, write down a date on your calendar and put out some possible times so they know they are a priority for you too. You can even keep these dates in ink on the same day every month if that’s what works. Just don’t leave it open-ended!

Make connection a priority.

Learning to feel connected with others can be a helpful skill when it comes to building resilience and improving our mental health. Poor social connections can lead to loneliness, which is associated with depression and anxiety.

Building strong connections can help us feel like we are not alone and that others care about us.

However, connecting with others can also be difficult. You may feel tired or drained after being around people. It might seem easier to stay at home than put in the effort of talking with someone else or going somewhere where you will see other people.

Regardless of what you are feeling, connecting with others is an important part of taking care of your own mental health.

By John Gurung

A former software developer who is now a blogging enthusiast. A true digital nomad.

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